The drinking water cycle

 
Between the moment of its being abstracted and its release into the natural environment, the water makes a long journey. Find out about tap water's extraordinary journey!
×

Message d'erreur

This page is only available on a bigger screen

1

Stage 1

In Wallonia, nearly 80% of the water that comes out of the tap is abstracted from underground water (also called groundwater). The remainder is drawn on the surface from dams, quarries, etc.

1

Stage 1

In Wallonia, nearly 80% of the water that comes out of the tap is abstracted from underground water (also called groundwater). The remainder is drawn on the surface from dams, quarries, etc.

2

Stage 2

To avoid any risk of pollution, the abstraction areas are protected. It is forbidden to do anything whatsoever around or close to a water collection point!

3

Stage 3

It rarely happens that water abstracted or drawn in the natural environment can be distributed without treatment. Groundwater is usually “aerated”. Surface water is subject to further treatment because it is more exposed to pollution. To ensure the bacteriological quality of the water in the pipes, throughout its underground journey to the tap, a very small quantity of chlorine is added to it.

4

Stage 4

The water has to flow immediately from the tap at any time of day. That is why it is stored in large quantities in water towers or reservoirs. There are over 1,500 of them in Wallonia!

5

Stage 5

Strict quality controls are carried out throughout the journey. The water that flows from the tap must be perfectly drinkable.

5

Stage 5

Strict quality controls are carried out throughout the journey. The water that flows from the tap must be perfectly drinkable.

5

Stage 5

Strict quality controls are carried out throughout the journey. The water that flows from the tap must be perfectly drinkable.

6

Stage 6

When leaving the storage areas, the water is routed to the taps of public and private buildings, but also to fire hydrants via the “distribution system”.

7

Stage 7

After having been used, the water (from baths, dish washing, clothes washing, etc.) is discharged into the sewers. Their waste water then flows into the water collection point. From there it goes to treatment plants where it is cleaned and purified before being discharged into nature. This water has been cleaned but is not drinkable.